About Us

Web design and development from the sunny suburbs of Philadelphia.

About Our Name

The name "Pedrera" was derived from "Casa Milá, La Pedrera", a building designed by the Catalan architect Antoni Gaudí. Gaudí (1852-1926) lived and worked in Barcelona during the city's modernista period. Possessing a genius for innovative design, he was able to redefine the stylistic boundaries of functional architecture.

Casa Milá is a superb example of Gaudí's imaginative approach to design. With its undulating facade and unconventional mixture of surface textures, the composition is definitively art nouveau. Every detail of Casa Milá enriches the structure as a whole, making it more of a functional sculpture than an apartment building.

Casa Milá Photo Gallery

Casa Milá: Principle Facade

Through the use of stone and brick columns, the facade was freed from any load-bearing requirements. This allowed for the irregular, wave-like design of the building's horizontal line.

  • Casa Milá

    Casa Milá: Principle Facade

    Through the use of stone and brick columns, the facade was freed from any load-bearing requirements. This allowed for the irregular, wave-like design of the building's horizontal line.

  • Casa Milá

    Casa Milá: Entrance Gate

    Many students of Gaudí have speculated about the inspiration for Casa Milá. The more common theories attribute the design's impetus to either the sea or mountains which surround Barcelona. By examining the curvilinear construction of the entrance gate, one could easily see the merit in either theory.

  • Casa Milá

    Casa Milá: Interior Courtyard Facade

    Upon entering the interior courtyard, one may observe Gaudí's use of contrasting textures. Here, the intricate ironwork of the balcony railings is played against the smooth stone surface of the walls.

  • Casa Milá

    Casa Milá: Attic Archways

    In the attic, the framework for the building's unusual roof is established by a series of parabolic arches. These arches, which are of differing dimensions, work around the structure to define the upper contour.

  • Casa Milá

    Casa Milá: Rooftop Elements

    Again, Gaudí's preoccupation with fluid lines may be seen in Casa Milá's rooftop elements. Each of the six staircase exits, two ventilation towers and seven chimneys were finished with trencadís, a technique where irregular shards of ceramics and stone are placed to create a pattern.